Agenda Themes at FinCrime Global:

Turbo-Charging the Regulators?

Regulators across the world are gaining new powers and resources to fight financial crime. Developments such as the U.S. Anti-Money Laundering Act (AMLA) of 2020, the EU’s anti-money laundering/combating the financing of terrorism (AML/CFT) plan, and the new EU-wide AML agency are all evidence of this.
But how effective are these moves likely to be? Are we on the verge of a new “push” to tackle financial crime, similar to that which led to the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) in the late 1980s—or do these changes lack real teeth?

FinCrime Global will explore:
- The recent and ongoing regulatory changes across the U.S., Europe, and Asia-Pacific region
- How firms can position themselves as supportive partners in change
- The problem of 'left behind' jurisdictions where regulators have fewer resources

The Hidden Risks of 'Tech-Fin'

Several well-established sectors have developed out of the rise of FinTech, including virtual assets, challenger banks, and payment services providers (PSPs).
But outside of these finance-specific applications of technology, the tech industry is re-purposing pre-existing tools with embedded financial services (“Tech-Fin”).
Social media companies, instant messaging services, e-commerce companies, online game developers—players in all these sectors are keen to implement financialization. But they sometimes do so without assessing the financial crime risks.

FinCrime global will explore:
- How actors from across sectors are repurposing FinTech in non-financial services contexts
- The financial crime risks arising from “financialised technology”
- How such risks impact FinTech and the wider financial services sector

From RegTech to EffectTech

Regulatory technologies (RegTech) are an established tool to help finance firms deliver on their anti-money laundering (AML) obligations.
But an important field is developing alongside RegTech, known as “EffectTech”—tech designed to help finance firms test and audit their systems to an external benchmark.

FinCrime Global will consider the core meaning of “effectiveness” and consider the role of tech, with sessions exploring:
- The use of automated penetration testing against financial crime controls
- Using synthetic datasets to test platform settings
- The development of commercial “typology libraries” for use in platforms

Sanctions: Weapon of Choice?

Sanctions are an increasingly important tool in the fight against financial crime and corruption.
Major democratic powers, such as the U.S., EU, and the U.K., are actively developing their human rights and corruption-focused sanctions systems. But states like China and Russia are developing measures designed to block Western sanctions.

FinCrime Global will help delegates understand:
- How sanctions can be used as a weapon against financial crime
- How broad“democratic” and “authoritarian” blocs are using economic and financial statecraft against each other—and how financial services providers can get caught in the middle
- How firms should approach compliance challenges in a world where sanctions regimes compete rather than complement one another

Systemic Solutions to a Systemic Problem

How can we improve effectiveness in the fight against financial crime?
One thing is clear: sticking plasters and short-term solutions are not the answer. Financial crime is a systemic problem requiring systemic solutions.


FinCrime Global will get to the heart of the problems of financial crime by exploring:
- Whether ongoing know-your-customer (KYC) utilities and private sector joint-monitoring experiments can contribute to effective systemic financial crime solutions
- How cooperation between the public and private sectors has developed to fight COVID-19 scams
- The role that service architectures, central bank digital currencies, crypto, and blockchain could play in providing a connected view of financial crime risks

Transparency Vs. Kleptocracy

Democracy depends on transparency and honest government. But societies trust in public officials—and the system of government itself—can falter when dirty money flows from autocratic regimes to democracies. The transfer of kleptocratic funds is increasingly seen as the major global financial crime threat.

FinCrime Global will explore:
- The root causes behind corrupt flows of klepto graphic funds
- How the global financial regime enables and nurtures kleptocracy
- How states are seeking to deal with kleptocracy through corporate transparency
- The role of financial services providers, data, and tech in tackling the problem

The Agenda:

7:55 am
Welcome Address
8:00 am
Keynote Session with Tom Burgis

Speakers Include:

Tom Burgis, Investigations Correspondent, Financial Times

8:45 am
Tainted Flows

Kleptocratic money flows, where they come from, and where they end up.

9:30 am
Investigating the Kleptocrats

A case study into a major kleptocratic laundering ring.

10:15 am
Is Transparency Enough?

A discussion of potential policy responses and what businesses can do to get a better view of client risk.

11:00 am
The Tools of First Resort

The development of current western sanctions regimes, and the increasing focusing on human rights, corruption and new technologies.

11:45 am
The Sanctioned Strike Back

Presentation on the development of new Chinese and Russian sanctions regimes, and the development of countermeasures and the use of crypto.

12:30 pm
Stuck in the Middle?

A discussion of what the development of western and other sanctions regimes mean for businesses, and what they can do about it.

1:45 pm
The Complex Web of Financial Crime

A discussion of the complex, inter-related, international and evolving nature of modern financial crime.

Speakers Include:

Nicholas Ryder, Professor in Financial Crime, University of the West of England

Gayatri Viswanath, Head of Financial Crime Compliance Training, Standard Chartered Bank

Paul Simmons, CEO, The Global Identity Foundation

Mark Cheeseman, Deputy Director, Public Sector Fraud, Cabinet Office

2:30 pm
Knowledge is Power

The development of KYC utilities and data sharing prospects, and their role in improving private sector insight into financial crime risks.

Speakers Include:

Helène Erftemeijer, KYC Lead, ING Bank

Nina Bryant, Managing Director - Information Governance, Privacy & Security, FTI Consulting

3:15 pm
Connecting the Dollar Signs

Discussing the development of systemic monitoring of client behaviours between institutions, and lessons to be learned from examples such as Transaction Monitoring Netherlands.

Speakers Include:

Mary-Jo de Leeuw, VP, Women in Cyber Security Foundation

Joanna Jenkins, Global Compliance Director - Growth Team, Railsbank

Aidan Larkin, CEO & Co-Founder, Asset Reality

4:00 pm
From Partnership to Integration

Reviewing the development of improved FIU-FIU collaboration and joint public-private anti-fraud taskforces dueing COVID.

4:45 pm
Sponsor Led Session

More details coming soon.

5:15 pm
Keynote Session with Oliver Bullough

Speakers Include:

Oliver Bullough, Journalist, Guardian

7:55 am
Welcome Address
8:00 am
Keynote Session

More details coming soon.

Find out more >
8:45 am
Risks on the Tech Edge

A discussion of how 'non-financial' technologies and platforms are becoming financialised and the financial crime risks they are generating as a result.

Speakers Include:

Iain Swaine, Head of Cyber Strategy EMEA, BioCatch

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9:30 am
Hello, I Love You, Won't You Tell Me Your PIN?

A presentation on the role social media is playing in the current fraud epidemic and how to combat it.

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10:15 am
Welcome to the eLaundry

Discussion of how the explosion in ecommerce has created multiple new opprtunities for fraudsters and launderers, and the key risk signs compliance professionals should look for.

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11:00 am
Innocent Games?

Discussion of how the online gaming industry has developed its own virtual financial system, and its vulnerability to financial crime.

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11:45 am
Sponsor Led Session

More details coming soon.

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12:15 pm
Assessing the RegTech Impact

Discussion of how regtech has so far impacted on the development of anti-financial crime, and whether it has improved efficiency or effectiveness more.

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1:00 pm
Putting it to the Test

Exploration of how AFC platform testing is shifting from internally driven mechanisms such as back testing to the use of synthetic data and automatic penetration testing.

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1:45 pm
Inside the Criminal's Handbook

Exploration of how mechanisms to share criminal typologies have developed between firms, as well as the development of technology solutions that can help firms know what to expect next from the criminals.

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2:30 pm
Europe Toughens Up

A discussion of the EU AML plan and the forthcoming creation of a single, EU-wide AML agency. What should businesses expect, and what difference will it really make?

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3:15 pm
New US Frontiers

A discussion of current developments in the US AML/CTF regime, especially investments in FinCEN and the progress of the beneficial ownership registry, as well as what these mean for US businesses.

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4:00 pm
Regulator Rhetoric, Tech Realities

A discussion of how well regulators are actually doing - beyond the rhetoric - in terms of supporting and promoting regtech solutions, and how the private sector would engage with regulators on the topic.

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4:45 pm
Sponsor Led Session

More details coming soon.

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5:15 pm
Keynote Session

More details coming soon.

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6:00 pm
Closing Remarks

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